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npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine Articles


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Npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine, a Nature Research Journal is the official Journal of the PCRS and the International Primary Care Group (IPCRG). An online, open access, journal, jointly owned by PCRS and Springer Nature, npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine is the only indexed scientific journal devoted to the management of respiratory diseases in primary care. The latest content published by the journal can be found below. Visit https://www.nature.com/npjpcrm for the full range of articles and information on how to submit.


COPD’s early origins in low-and-middle income countries: what are the implications of a false start?

COPD’s early origins in low-and-middle income countries: what are the implications of a false start?, Published online: 05 March 2019; doi:10.1038/s41533-019-0117-y

COPD’s early origins in low-and-middle income countries: what are the implications of a false start?

Perceptions of complementary/alternative medicine use and influence on evidence-based asthma medicine adherence in Malaysian children

Perceptions of complementary/alternative medicine use and influence on evidence-based asthma medicine adherence in Malaysian children, Published online: 25 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41533-019-0118-x

Perceptions of complementary/alternative medicine use and influence on evidence-based asthma medicine adherence in Malaysian children

The role of oral magnesium supplements for the management of stable bronchial asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

The role of oral magnesium supplements for the management of stable bronchial asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Published online: 18 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41533-019-0116-z

The role of oral magnesium supplements for the management of stable bronchial asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Pathways to diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: a descriptive cohort study

Pathways to diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: a descriptive cohort study, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0113-7

Examining events leading to the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Australia yields insights to guide further research and perhaps improve the pathways to diagnosis. NSCLC is by far the most common form of lung cancer. Researchers, led by the Cancer Institute New South Wales, investigated clinical care contacts leading to diagnosis, using a descriptive cohort study of 894 patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2012. The researchers quantified contact with GPs and lung specialists, hospital admissions and diagnostic imaging procedures. Living in remote locations had little influence on access to services. More than half of the patients did not see a lung specialist during the pathway to diagnosis, while a quarter received their diagnosis in an emergency setting. Further research should investigate whether there are barriers preventing timely diagnosis.

Comparison of adverse events associated with different spacers used with non-extrafine beclometasone dipropionate for asthma

Comparison of adverse events associated with different spacers used with non-extrafine beclometasone dipropionate for asthma, Published online: 08 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41533-019-0115-0

A study of spacer devices for use with asthma inhalers shows no significant difference in the incidence of side-effects between licensed and unlicensed spacers. Spacers offer a way of improving the dose inhaled, particularly in children and those adults who struggle to use asthma inhalers correctly. However, non-extrafine beclomethasone dipropionate (like Clenil Modulite) inhalers are frequently co-prescribed with unlicensed Aerochamber spacers rather than the Volumatic spacer which is licensed for this drug. David Price at the University of Aberdeen, UK, and co-workers analysed data from two historical studies to verify whether Aerochamber use enhanced the risk of unpleasant side effects for patients, such as oral thrush or hoarseness. They found no significant difference between licensed and unlicensed spacers and the chances of adverse events, suggesting both are suitable for use with non-extrafine beclomethasone dipropionate inhalers.

Author Correction: “Tossing a coin:” defining the excessive use of short-acting beta2-agonists in asthma—the views of general practitioners and asthma experts in primary and secondary care

Author Correction: “Tossing a coin:” defining the excessive use of short-acting beta2-agonists in asthma—the views of general practitioners and asthma experts in primary and secondary care, Published online: 14 January 2019; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0114-6

Author Correction: “Tossing a coin:” defining the excessive use of short-acting beta2-agonists in asthma—the views of general practitioners and asthma experts in primary and secondary care

Prospective observational study validating the German version of the Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARAT10)

Prospective observational study validating the German version of the Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARAT10), Published online: 04 December 2018; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0112-8

A newly-translated German version of a two-factor asthma test shows promise as a reliable tool for assessing disease control. Asthma frequently co-exists with allergic rhinitis (AR), a condition in which allergies cause irritation and inflammation of the nasal passages. To verify asthma control under AR, a Portuguese team developed the Control of Allergic Rhinitis and Asthma Test (CARAT10). Now, Christoph Ulrich Werner at the Technical University of Munich in Germany and co-workers have translated CARAT10 into German and verified its reliability and validity for use in the German population. The team trialed their CARAT10 version with 213 patients, 101 of whom had concurrent AR, and compared the results with three standardised asthma questionnaires. They found that CARAT10 was a better fit to verify disease control for patients with co-existing AR than in such.