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npj Primary Care Respiratory Medicine Articles

The new title for Primary Care Respiratory Journal following an agreement with Nature Publishing Group to re-launch the journal as part of the Nature Partner Journals series.

Systematic review of association between critical errors in inhalation and health outcomes in asthma and COPD

Systematic review of association between critical errors in inhalation and health outcomes in asthma and COPD, Published online: 16 November 2018; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0110-x

Systematic review of association between critical errors in inhalation and health outcomes in asthma and COPD

IMP2ART systematic review of education for healthcare professionals implementing supported self-management for asthma

IMP<sup>2</sup>ART systematic review of education for healthcare professionals implementing supported self-management for asthma, Published online: 06 November 2018; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0108-4

IMP2ART systematic review of education for healthcare professionals implementing supported self-management for asthma

Cross-sectional study assessing the performance of the Arabic translated childhood asthma control test

Cross-sectional study assessing the performance of the Arabic translated childhood asthma control test, Published online: 01 November 2018; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0109-3

The cut-off score suggestive of poor disease management in the Childhood Asthma Control Test (C-ACT) may need to be changed for different geographical populations. Majid AlTeneiji at Tawam Hospital in Al-Ain, and co-workers across the United Arab Emirates compared the performance of the Arabic version of the C-ACT with the global asthma control test, GINA, in verifying levels of asthma and treatment control. The researchers enrolled 105 children aged 4 to 11 who completed both tests. The Arabic C-ACT performed with high reliability and validity, but the team found that the original English cut-point score of 19, indicating poor disease management, should be raised to 20 in their Arabic population to improve test accuracy. AlTeneiji’s team suggest that the C-ACT test points system may need to be revised for different geographical settings around the world.

Diagnostic value of signs, symptoms and diagnostic tests for diagnosing pneumonia in ambulant children in developed countries: a systematic review

Diagnostic value of signs, symptoms and diagnostic tests for diagnosing pneumonia in ambulant children in developed countries: a systematic review, Published online: 26 October 2018; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0104-8

Diagnostic value of signs, symptoms and diagnostic tests for diagnosing pneumonia in ambulant children in developed countries: a systematic review

Prospective observational cohort study of symptom control prediction in paediatric asthma by using the Royal College of Physicians three questions

Prospective observational cohort study of symptom control prediction in paediatric asthma by using the Royal College of Physicians three questions, Published online: 24 October 2018; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0107-5

Validated asthma control tests should be used to assess children rather than the ‘three questions’ survey recently developed by the Royal College of Physicians. The UK-based organisation developed the RCP3Q as a practical, rapid way of assessing asthma control in primary care. However, the RCP3Q was never comprehensively trialed for use with children. Erol Gaillard and co-workers at the University of Leicester compared the RCP3Q with three validated tests and questionnaires to determine its efficacy in assessing patients aged 5 to 16. 319 child patients completed the validated tests and their RCP3Q responses were collected immediately afterwards on the same day. In comparison with validated tests, the RCP3Q varied in its accuracy depending on the threshold scores selected. A threshold score of 1 resulted in 25 per cent of participants being misclassified with uncontrolled asthma.

A non-randomised controlled pilot study of clinical pharmacist collaborative intervention for community dwelling patients with COPD

A non-randomised controlled pilot study of clinical pharmacist collaborative intervention for community dwelling patients with COPD, Published online: 10 October 2018; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0105-7

Clinical pharmacists, working in collaboration with respiratory specialists, can help people who live at home with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) better manage their medications and symptoms. In a non-randomised pilot study, Richard Lowrie from the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde,
UK, and colleagues found that patients with COPD who receive standard at-home care—which includes visits to GP surgeries and hospital-based respiratory out-patient clinics, and visits from respiratory specialist nurses—were more likely to experience exacerbations and need lengthy hospital stays than those who additionally received home visits from a clinical pharmacist. The pharmacist, in consultation with the patient’s respiratory physician, often proposed medication changes and suggested additional testing or referrals that presumably explain the improved health outcomes. The authors conclude that a large, randomised trial is warranted to further evaluate the merits of this collaborative intervention for community dwelling patients with COPD.

Primary care cohort study in the sequence of diagnosing chronic respiratory diseases and prescribing inhaled corticosteroids

Primary care cohort study in the sequence of diagnosing chronic respiratory diseases and prescribing inhaled corticosteroids, Published online: 09 October 2018; doi:10.1038/s41533-018-0106-6

Primary care cohort study in the sequence of diagnosing chronic respiratory diseases and prescribing inhaled corticosteroids